Skip to main content
Advertisement
Advertisement
Installing Optilicers on   Bakkafrost's vessel
Installing Optilicers on Bakkafrost's vessel "Martin". Image: Trond Viggo Kvingedal.

The Norwegian shipyard Havyard is increasingly looking to diversify into aquaculture, and believes that the conversion of vessels from the offshore industry is going to be increasingly popular.

Advertisement

The boatyard traditionally concentrated on building boats for the offshore industry, but has recently converted a vessel from offshore to aquaculture for Bakkafrost, and is currently fitting Optilicer systems to it.

Trygve Solaas, Director of Havyard Ship Technologies. Image: Havyard.
Trygve Solaas, Director of Havyard Ship Technologies. Image: Havyard.

As Trygve Solaas, Vice President of Havyard Ship Technology, told kyst.no: “The oil-related activity at the yard has gone down, but we also see opportunities in other industries such as aquaculture, wind energy, and the construction of ferries.”

The Optilicers, which should each be able to delouse 100 tonnes of salmon per hour, were fitted onto Martin – a vessel which the yard converted for Bakkafrost, which was formerly known as Havila Princess, when operated by the shipping company Havila.

Solaas thinks there will be an increasing number of vessel conversions in the future.

“There are many PSVs [platform supply vessels] and similar boats in circulation, which are currently cheap to buy and comparatively easy to redevelop,” he notes.

According to the director, both the conversion and the installation of the Optilicers have gone well.

“The boat will be completed this week. This is the first time we have carried out work for Bakkafrost. We are very happy to have secured this contract because they are a major player. We obviously hope for more cooperation and new contracts in the future,” he adds.

The yard is also currently working on the construction of the wellboat Steigen which will be completed for Norsk Fisketransport in the spring.

 

 

Advertisement