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One of the huge exhibition halls that hosts the Seafood Expo Global on the outskirts of Brussels. Photo: FFE.
One of the huge exhibition halls that hosts the Seafood Expo Global on the outskirts of Brussels. Photo: FFE.

Scotland’s salmon farmers are being encouraged to once again gather under the Seafood Scotland banner at Seafood Expo Global in Brussels in May.

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Seafood Scotland is recruiting companies to join it at the giant trade show, which last year attracted more than 29,000 buyers, suppliers and members of the media.

Natalie Bell, head of trade marketing Asia, Europe and Middle East at Seafood Scotland, said: “Seafood Expo Global is the biggest opportunity for Scottish seafood companies to engage with buyers, suppliers and media from all over the world. From China, Thailand and Japan to North America and Europe, the event is a global showcase to help drive growth and secure new business for Scottish companies.

New supply chains

“Last year, 21 companies attended Seafood Expo Global as part of the Scottish delegation with a further 20 visiting independently, all benefiting from meeting influential buyers looking to secure new supply chains and sustainable fish and seafood.

“We hope to see as many, if not more, companies come forward and join us in Brussels in May to help continue the growing impact Scottish seafood has on Scotland’s economy.”

Fergus Ewing: Has warned of catastrophic delays after Brexit.
Fergus Ewing: Has warned of catastrophic delays after Brexit.

This year’s event on May 7-9 will be the first in which the UK will not be a member of the European Union, assuming Brexit in one form or another occurs on March 29.

Scotland’s rural economy secretary Fergus Ewing, who reiterated his long-standing support for aquaculture during a visit to the 2018 Expo, recently highlighted the failure of the Westminster Government to ensure tariff-free access to the European market for Scottish seafood exports. He warned that non-tariff barriers like customs delays at ports could be catastrophic for an industry that relies on frictionless passage across borders.

Key event

Salmon farmers that took part under the Scottish banner last year included large producers such as the Scottish Salmon Company and Scottish Sea Farms, as well as smaller producers Loch Duart and Wester Ross Fisheries.

Marine Harvest (now Mowi) and Cooke had separate stands in other parts of the vast exhibition space.

Julie Hesketh-Laird, chief executive of the Scottish Salmon Producers Organisation, said the Expo was a key event in the fish calendar.

“It’s an important commercial showcase for the Scottish salmon industry in Europe and beyond,” said Hesketh-Laird.

“Companies also benefit from discussing with customers the latest advances in their farming techniques to support their commitment to producing high-quality salmon. The show is also a useful forum to meet international colleagues in salmon farming to share industry updates.”

Companies wanting to take part are encouraged to contact natalie.bell@seafoodscotland.org for more information.

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