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On the drawing board: the FjordMAX is the latest in a series of innovative proposals from Norway. Image: NSK Ship Design.
On the drawing board: the FjordMAX is the latest in a series of innovative proposals from Norway. Image: NSK Ship Design.

Norwegian salmon grower Salak AS has revealed further details of its "FjordMax", a semi-closed integrated farming platform. The concept aims to multiply Norwegian fish farming production, eliminate escapes and reduce organic emissions by 90 per cent.

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Salak has applied for nine development licences for the FjordMax, designed in cooperation with NSK Ship Design, and is seeking a maximum biomass limit of 7,020 tonnes.

"We've tried to think inwardly in our near-coastal areas, and how we can best utilise the areas that have given the Norwegian aquaculture industry competitive advantage," says Odd Bekkeli, general manager of Salak AS.

The FjordMAX design is semi-enclosed and fully integrated, with all the operations taking place within a single platform.

Karl Erik Bekkeli:
Karl Erik Bekkeli: "We can increase production within a reduced area".

"With this technology, we can increase production within a reduced area compared to what aquaculture occupies today, while making both previously used and new coastal areas available. We think it is an exciting project and look forward to the next stage," says project manager Karl Erik Bekkeli.

FjordMAX is a triangular supporting steel structure with three production units. The FjordMAX is 165 metres long, 153m wide, and 6m high. The production units have a 66m diameter. The investment costs for the project are estimated at NOK 544 million (£53m).

"Our mission is to contribute to the development of a concept for efficient land use, is escape proof and provide the basis for maximum production within a limited geographic area without unacceptable environmental impact," says Thomas Myhre, sales manager at NSK Ship Design.

Efforts to bring forward the concept have been ongoing since  spring 2016. The companies Lift Up, Xylem, SalGard, Vónin Refa, Findings, YPK and iAKVAhave all been involved.

The FjordMAX is the 37th application for sought-after development permits in Norway, now largely the only way for farmers to get permission for substantial biomass increases. So far five have received approval, though not necessarily with the full amount of licences and biomass requested, while 18 have been rejected.

 

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