Skip to main content
Advertisement
Advertisement
The Atlantis submersible cage was stocked for the second time this week. Photo: SinkabergHansen.
The Atlantis submersible cage was stocked for the second time this week. Photo: SinkabergHansen.

The developers of the Atlantis submersible salmon pen have released 100,000 fish into the cage – 10 times as many as a first test batch last year.

Advertisement

The fish, with an average weight of 3 kilos, were de-loused on release and the cage was then lowered to a depth of about 30 metres. They will be harvested this summer.

“The operation was well planned and was carried out without any problems whatsoever. The fish calmed down quickly and quickly had good movement in the cage,” said project manager Trude Olafsen.

The fish, which had an average weight of 3kg, were deloused during transfer to the cage. Photo: SinkabergHansen.
The fish, which had an average weight of 3kg, were deloused during transfer to the cage. Photo: SinkabergHansen.

Air dome

The salmon also quickly began feeding after Atlantis was lowered. At depth, the fish have access to an air dome so they can adjust their swim bladders. The system also utilises waterborne feeding and customised lighting.

Atlantic Subsea Farming is a collaboration between Norwegian farmer SinkabergHansen, aquaculture supplier AKVA Group and AKVA subsidiary Egersund Net. SinkabergHansen farms in Trøndelag and Nordland.

Changes have been made since the first test stocking. These include installing load shackles to get a better picture of the environmental forces that affect the cage construction. 

New milestone

The entire control system with associated technology is now built into a container, so that it can more easily be moved between different barges.

Olafsen is well satisfied with the operation, said a report on SinkabergHansen’s website. With 100,000 fish in the cage, the project is approaching a normal operating situation, and will harvest useful experience data in the coming weeks.

“Everyone involved did a great job at the launch, and now the fish will be followed closely by SinkabergHansen’s experienced operating technicians and veterinarians. A new milestone in the project has been reached,” said Olafsen.

Advertisement