A short video explaining the benefits of SSF's hybrid feed barge at Loch Spelve, Mull. Photo: SSF.
A short video explaining the benefits of SSF's hybrid feed barge at Loch Spelve, Mull. Photo: SSF.

Salmon farmer shortlisted for top green award

Salmon producer Scottish Sea Farms’ efforts to reduce its carbon footprint have led to it being shortlisted for an Outstanding Achievement Award as part of the VIBES Scottish Environment Business Awards.

Publisert

SSF is one of 35 companies to receive a Good Practice Award in the 2021 VIBES, and one of 12 to be shortlisted for a further honour.

The company has introduced a bespoke hybrid power system aboard one of its feed barges at its Loch Spelve farm on Mull, dramatically reducing fuel consumption, carbon emissions and operating costs.

£18,000 a year saved

Designed, built and monitored by UK company Aqua Power Technologies, the hybrid concept was shown to offset 32,408kg in carbon between the time the pilot began in September 2020 and February 2021.

The total annual carbon offset is estimated at 79,400kg, and the annual net saving in diesel costs is around £18,000.

A polycrub made by The Polycrub Company, from Shetland. The company recycles pipes from fish farms for use as hoops in its polycrubs. Click on image to enlarge. Photo: The Polycrub Company.
A polycrub made by The Polycrub Company, from Shetland. The company recycles pipes from fish farms for use as hoops in its polycrubs. Click on image to enlarge. Photo: The Polycrub Company.

Another of the shortlisted firms is The Polycrub Company, Shetland, that works with the aquaculture industry to reuse and recycle pipes. These are incorporated into a material that can withstand winds of 120 miles an hour so is therefore suitable for growing fresh produce in otherwise hostile environments.

MiAlgae, a start-up company using distillery by-products to grow an algae-based salmon feed ingredient, was among the 35 firms to receive a Good Practice Award, as was SAMS Enterprise, the commercial arm of the Scottish Association for Marine Science.  

Fertiliser from hatchery

SSF won a VIBES Award last year for it work to recycle waste from its Barcaldine hatchery into agricultural fertiliser. The company uses technology by Norwegian engineering company Scanship to aerate waste such as fish faeces and uneaten feed to prevent any unwanted bacteria from germinating, then binds it together into larger particles via the addition of a cationic polymer.

The waste is then filtered to separate the solids from the water and the resulting sludge is collected in a storage tank. Once the sludge has been certified as being safe by an external assessor, it is then uplifted by tractor and barrel for use on farmland.

The VIBES are a partnership between the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA), the Scottish Government, Energy Saving Trust, Highland & Islands Enterprise, Scottish Enterprise, South of Scotland Enterprise, Scottish Water, Zero Waste Scotland and NatureScot.

Innovation and ambition

SEPA chief executive Terry A’Hearn, who is head of the VIBES judging panel, said: “In a few weeks’ time the eyes of the world will be on Scotland as global leaders gather (at COP26 in Glasgow) to accelerate the actions required to address the enormous climate challenges we face.

“VIBES Scottish Environment Business Awards, linked to SEPA’s ambitious ‘One Planet Prosperity’ strategy, recognise Scotland’s leading businesses who show a real commitment to sustainable goods, products and services through leadership, innovation and ambition.

“I would like to congratulate all the finalists who have shown Scotland can be at the forefront of finding sustainable solutions to take on the climate emergency.”